"The classic Bolton School combination is hard work, good friends, challenging and thought-provoking teaching, a healthy desire to puncture the self-important and the sense that you can work hard to achieve things in life. "

Anthony Lilley OBE - CEO, Magic Lantern & Professor, Creative Industries, Ulster University

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Nobel Prize Winner Returns to Bolton School

Wednesday, 23 June 2010

Professor Sir Harry Kroto, Nobel Prize Winner in Chemistry, returned to his old school to deliver a day of workshops and talks aimed at inspiring an interest in Science amongst the region's young people.  Sir Harry addressed over 600 pupils from across the region during his busy day at Bolton School.  The day of fun activities and lectures was part of the Ogden Trust Science Partnership, an initiative between local schools and universities which aims to promote science and engineering to young people.  Sir Harry ran a similar science day at the School last year.

Primary schools from across the region were treated to a short talk from Sir Harry before setting about the hands-on task of building representations of the carbon molecule, C60 Buckminsterfullerene or "buckyballs", that Sir Harry discovered and that led to him being awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1996.

Year 4 pupil, Namitha Aravind from Bolton School said: "When we went to meet Harry Kroto, he taught us Science and explained it in a very good way. I really enjoyed making the buckyball. He was very kind." 

In the afternoon, secondary schools learnt about the life of Sir Harry and his passion for science and art and design and of the importance of pursuing a wide range of interests.  He talked about how his interest in how things work has always driven him and he has marvelled at how science has changed the world. He now works towards using the power of science to help solve the world's problems. 

Throughout the day Sir Harry showed a natural engagement with the pupils and really did prove to be a wonderful communicator.  He said: "It was fantastic to talk to these young children - the students I address are usually much older.  Spreading the word about how science can help, indeed save, humanity is critical.  Once again, I have had a wonderful day."

Sir Harry is now aged 70 and is focussing more of his efforts on using the Internet as a learning tool.  His work with the Vega Science Trust has seen him and other scientists put presentations and learning materials online which can be viewed worldwide at: http://vega.org.uk/

 

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Sir Harry and Junior Girls

Junior Girls from Bolton School were amongst many youngsters benefiting from the wisdom of Sir Harry

A natural

Sir Harry was a natural communicator and ensured hundreds of pupils remained on task

Goodbye

Sir Harry waves goodbye to the primary school children