"Pupils are self-assured, purposeful and mutually supportive - they readily accept responsibility and assume a variety of leadership roles."

ISI Inspection of the Girls' Division 2016

Read more testimonials

The Golden Age (1950-1980)

The following battered Banda sheet is all that remains of a typical feature of the next period of camping, when scarcely any member of the teaching staff could avoid involvement in the extraordinary detailed programme.

“CAMPS AND JOURNEYS COMMITTEE

There will be a meeting of the Camps and Journeys Committee on Tuesday, October 20th, at 1.15 pm in the Headmaster’s Study.

All Masters are welcome.

AGENDA

  • Minutes of last meeting
  •  Financial statement
  • 1959-60 Programme (outlined below)
  • Any other business

Proposed Programme 1959-1960:

Dates

 

Probable Cost

New Year: 28 Dec-2 Jan

YH Party Cumberland CHI

5.0.0

Ski Course Cairngorms

 

15.0.0

Yelland Hike HAP

 

 

Senior Scout Hike DA

 

 

Easter: 13-16 April 

Lilleshall CricketCoaching

 

14-18, 11-25 April Highlands CHI

 

 

Scouts New Forest HAP

 

 

Senior Scouts Pennine Way DA

 

 

French Exchange KH

 

 

Bolton Holidays

Junior School Grasmere BH

 

24 June-1 July

Shells Camp Llanbedrog

5.0.0

Thirds/Fourths Camp Saundersfoot HVB

 

 

1st-2nds Cricket Tour Bristol RB

 

 

Summer: 8-25 Aug 

Trek Camp Slovakia CHI

28.0.0

19 Aug-5 Sept

Austria/Dolomites WEB

29.0.0

German Exchange CLMH

 

 

French Exchange KJH

 

 

Scout Long Camp Hereford HAP

 

 

Senior Scout Camp Denmark DA

 

 

Late August

Theatre Camp Stratford FG

5.0.0”

Despite its complexity, this is not the last word.  Several other events arose without warning: occasional form hostel trips were never officially sanctioned.

The pattern of the new times is quite stunning.  Since 1910 there was one main camp, but even before the Second World War the School had branched out in all directions.  One that has already appeared is the Junior School camp at Grasmere.

The Scout group (19th Bolton (Bolton School)), which is listed here, appeared in 1915 and developed an active camping programme of its own, which by 1930 included two main parts, the Troop of two sections each of six patrols, and the Senior Troop of six or eight patrols.

19th BOLTON SCOUT GROUP

LONG CAMPS

COMBINED SCOUT/SENIOR SCOUT CAMPS

1915: Ribchester

1916:Ainsdell

1917:Turton

1918:Turton

 

1919: Turton

1920:Penmon

1921:Brigg

1922:Penmon

 

1923: Patterdale

1924:Patterdale

1925:Williton

1926:Patterdale

 

1927: Dyffryn

1928:Pyrenees

1929:Borrowdale

 

 

1930: Bossington

1931:Pyrenees

1932:Borrowdale

 

 

1933: Bossington

 

 

 

 

SCOUT TROOP

SENIOR SCOUT TROOP

 

1934: Lannercost

Norway

 

1935: Patterdale

Caledonian Canal

 

1936: Carolles

Normandy

 

1937: Kirkmichael

Norway

 

1938: Powerscourt

Norway

 

1939: Easdale

Connemara

 

1940: Wray

Buttermere

 

1941: Wray

Loweswater

 

1942: Wray

Codsall

 

1943: Wray Castle

Sauton Bridge

 

1944: Wray Castle

Llandrillo

 

1945: Borrowdale

Selworthy

 

1946: Talyllyn

Rathmullen

 

1947: Wray Castle

Brittany

 

1948: Wray

Norway

 

1949: Powerscourt

Pyrenees

 

1950: Talyllyn

Norfolk Broads

 

1951: Ashburton

Spain

 

1952: Powerscourt

Corsica

 

1953: Monzie

Normandy/Brittany

 

1954: Buckland

Luxembourg

 

1955: Wiltz

Luxembourg/Switzerland

 

1956: Dyffryn

Spain/France

 

1957: Monaive

Austria/Yugoslavia

 

1958: Coldridge

Netherlands

 

1959: Powerscourt

Black Forest

 

1960: Dolgellau

Denmark

 

1961: Monaive

Pyrenees

 

1962: Stogursey

Netherlands

 

1963: Monzie

Corsica/Pyrenees

 

1964: Bolgellau

Norway

 

1965: Powerscourt

Austria/Yugoslavia

 

1966: Dulverton

Pyrenees

 

1967: Monzie

Netherlands

 

1968: Kilarney

Switzerland

 

1969: Dolgellau

Denmark

 

1970: Duns Castle

Yugoslavia

 

1971: Auchinleck

Normandy

 

1972: Aberffrwd

Black Forest

 

1973: Eyemouth

Yugoslavia

 

1974: Oban

Luxembourg

 

1975: Llanwrtyd

Normandy

 

1976: Aberffrwd

Netherlands

 

1977: Eyemouth

Brittany

 

1978: Oban

Luxembourg

 

1979: Llanwrtyd

Spain

 

1980: Aberffrwd

Brittany

 

1981: Eyemouth

Denmark

 

1982: Oban

Hebrides

 

1983: Dolgellau

Norway

 

1984: Monzie

Southern Ireland

 

1985: Aberffrwd

1986: Eyemouth

1987: Dolgellau

1988: Crief

1989: Aberffrwd

1990: Ardchattan

1991: Dolgellau

1992: Eyemouth

1993: Aberffrwd

1994: Ardchattan 

1995: Eyemouth

1996: Aberffrwd

1997: Tayport

1998: Ardchattan

1999: Eyemouth

2000: Tayport

2001: Calgary (Canada)

2002: Eyemouth

2003: Hebrides

2004: Ardchattan

2005: Hebrides

2006: Tayport

2007: Rotterdam (Netherlands)

2008: Eyemouth   

The influx of all these had camps, ranging from large standing summer camps to small patrols, cycle camps and very small hike camps.  In the Troop the main camps rotated around the countries of the British Isles.  From the early thirties the Senior Troop camps were overseas.  I append lists below.

During the two wars the School supported a strong cadet corps which had regular summer camps which seem to run military drill exercises particularly involving School Sergeants and many staff with military ranks.

The reports of all these camps fill many pages of The Boltonian editions of the day, hinting at problems between competing dates, with laments from boys driven apart by business clashes.

Another feature of growing business was clashes of departmental events such as language exchanges and hobbies trips.  All these competing events led to the formation by F R Poskitt of a 'Camps and Journeys Committee', open to all members of the teaching staff, usually in the Spring Term, with the function of authorising or approving ventures to try and avoid clashes of dates.  It always struggled and was never completely successful in restraining the enthusiasm of staff and boys. 

The following paragraphs do not attempt to arrange camps and journeys in any order of merit, but to try to bring into focus the complexity of activity during the years following the Second World War.

The main School camp of the past had been in the Bolton Holiday, available to all boys above 11 years, run by the Headmaster, then Gwynne Jones, then H V Brookes with a team of teaching staff, a School Sergeant and a team of Senior Boys.

In 1948 HVB moved its location from North Wales to South Wales (alternating with Balycastle), where he had been brought up.  The tiny coal and fishing port of Saundersfoot became its home, and still (2014) is!