"I believe that my sons’ education at Bolton School has been the best investment I have ever made and I heartily commend it to all prospective new parents. "

Eric Fairweather, Parent

Read more testimonials

Frontiers of Physics at Bolton School

Friday, 12 October 2012

Bolton School hosted the Frontiers of Physics lectures bringing together over 250 pupils and 60 parents and staff from 7 schools in the Bolton and Leyland areas.

Pupils were treated to a series of lectures and the opportunity to ask real scientists questions.

Heather Williams from the Biomedical Institute presented a lecture on seeing with Gamma rays. Heather guided the audience through the use of Gamma rays as imaging devices and also the technology used to do this. Heather showed how fundamental research can lead to applications many decades after the initial discoveries and encouraged pupils to believe that they could be the people who invent and make use of applications that come from research that is taking place today. 

Sophie Allen form the National Space Centre presented an inspiring lecture on the impact that investigating space can have on our lives and the current exploration projects such as the curiosity mission on Mars. The audience also had an opportunity to view themselves through an infra-red camera and this was linked to infra-red astronomy.

For the finale of the event the great hall was linked, via video conference, to CERN in Geneva where Scientists working on the ATLAS and CMS experiments using the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) treated the audience to a short presentation on their work. After this there was a question and answer session where pupils had the opportunity to talk directly to the Scientists at CERN. Dr Mick Storr commented: “We were very impressed by the interest of the students and the questions that they asked.”

The event was organised by Brendan Ickringill, Ogden Physics Teacher Fellow based at Bolton School and Caroline Molyneux, head of Science at Balshaws High School.

Share or bookmark with:

CERN

Students in the Great Hall linked up with scientists at CERN in Geneva